good reads | 20

target collaboration whowhatwear

I love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. Here are my good reads from the week that was.

Good Reads

John Oliver nails it, again, in this scathing piece on fast fashion.

Related, and absurdly awesome: Who What Wear designs their dream Target collaborations. 

Frank Bruni is one of my beloved writers, but I’d never read this piece of his (dating back to 2013) until this week when it was linked on Gretchen Rubin’s blog. He hits masterfully on the complex, lovely and often inexplicable relationships we have with our siblings, together and separately.

But still the myth persists: there’s no such thing as a tongue map.

The best hummus recipe out there.  

For Austin’s birthday dinner last weekend, we bought tickets to Alinea, the restaurant that spearheaded the brilliant tickets-only-no-reservation-peak-pricing model that’s taking hold at many fine restaurants. 

Other Roundups to Love

Molly Yeh’s Friday Links (updated Fridays)

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

A Practical Wedding’s Happy Hour (updated Fridays)

Elise Blaha Cripe’s Weekend Links (updated Saturdays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (updated infrequently, but excellent)

[lead image: Laura Kay for Who What Wear]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday morning.

2 thoughts on “good reads | 20

    1. We did — it was wonderful! When I ate there in 2009 and 2011, they hadn’t yet introduced the ticket model… you just made reservations with a fine if you cancelled too late.

      This time around, they had introduced the ticket model. The price of a set meal depends on the date/time of your reservation. It works like concert tickets — better seats cost more money (in this case, weekend/7PM is most expensive) and if you can’t use them, it’s up to you to sell them and recoup costs. I think it’s a smart model for restaurants with significant operating/food/service costs who take a huge hit when a diner cancels without sufficient warning.

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