good reads | 42

giovanna-battaglias-wedding-capri-alexander-mcqueen-giambattista-valli-azzedine-alaia-sarah-burton-peter-dundas-anna-dello-russo-celebrityI love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. To that end, here are my good reads from the week that was.

Good Reads

A fascinating piece about the four quadrants of introversion, based on emerging research. Another good reminder that, just like extroversion, introversion is not one-size-fits-all.

Feminist emojis.

My longtime sartorial icon, Giovanna Battaglia, was married in Capri. HEAD EXPLODES at the awesomeness of it all.

Wolfgang Buttress’ Hive — the central installation of the UK pavilion at last year’s World Expo in Milan — was one of our favourites. It’s getting a second life back home in London.

Choir! Choir! Choir! is such a happy part of Toronto’s social fabric and I’m thrilled they’re receiving international acclaim.

Brilliant writer Edward Readicker-Henderson passed away this week. I’m keeping him in memory through his words and this TED talk, which is full of so many poignant, stirring passages. He will be missed.

giovanna battaglia wedding

Other Roundups to Love

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

Food52’s Weekend Reading (updated Sundays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (last updated: 2016/02/25)

[images: the wedding of Giovanna Battaglia]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday (or Saturday or Sunday) morning.

good reads | 41

george clooney esquire 2016I love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. To that end, here are my good reads from the week that was.

Good Reads

The glass brick facade on the new Chanel building in Amsterdam is stunning.

I’m obsessed with Wine Folly’s new beautifully designed and super functional wine maps of the world.

Chef Mina Stone shares cooking lessons from her Yiayia. My Papou’s favourite dish is faki, so her memories felt very close to home.

This is what a great interview looks like. David Granger talks to George Clooney for the May 2016 issue of Esquire.

Farm-to-table: the term that’s become so abused and ubiquitous that it’s almost useless to a caring diner. This is a shame for the chefs who do commit the energy and expense to cook on a local scale with local ingredients.

On one of our Mexico trips, Austin and I spent a day touring the mountains of Jalisco and learning how racilla and tequila are made. I’d love to do the same for mezcal when we eventually make it to Oaxaca. 

I was never a big Sex and the City viewer, but that doesn’t stop me from loving this probing piece on its four genre-bending female archetypes. 

A primer on chili pastes.

Long form: I devoured Emily St. John Mandel’s Station Elevena post-apocalyptic novel that begins in my beloved Toronto, in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood I spent many of my formative years. This is one of those books I had on hold for a year at the library, but kept missing each time it would come in. It was worth the wait — crisp, elegant writing, gorgeously interwoven narratives and a haunting little glimpse into our shared humanity. I love post-apocalyptic anything — movies, books, short fiction — for what they reveal about the world in this moment. Station Eleven is the genre in its best form.

Other Roundups to Love

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

Food52’s Weekend Reading (updated Sundays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (last updated: 2016/02/25)

[lead image: Nigel Perry for Esquire]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday (or Saturday or Sunday) morning.

good reads | 40

linguistic family tree

I love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. To that end, here are my good reads from the week that was.

Good Reads

Pairing Girl Scout Cookies and table wine is a terrible, terrible idea. Food & Wine investigates. 

Something to keep handy on this first (at last!) warm spring day in Toronto. Transitioning from winter to spring: a mental guide. 

Dave Beran is leaving the Alinea Group to open his own restaurant in LA. I’ve eaten half-a-dozen amazing meals at the hands of Beran through the years — at Alinea and then Next, so I look forward to experiencing food that’s entirely his own out west.

An illustrated linguistic family tree. 

One of my favourite chefs and food writers, Dan Barber, explores taste, religious law and tradition — and their intersection — in a beautiful essay about matzo. 

Zaha Hadid’s architectural legacy.

Long form: I just wrapped up Ethan Canin’s A Doubter’s Almanac and adored this book. It appealed to the part of me who enjoys math and puzzles — but you certainly don’t need a love of math to dive into the story. Canin has a luxurious way with words and builds memorable, round characters who lead us through a narrative at its core about the pursuit of happiness and the decisions we make. Well worth a read.

Other Roundups to Love

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

Food52’s Weekend Reading (updated Sundays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (last updated: 2016/02/25)

[lead image: Minna Sundberg’s illustrated linguistic tree]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday (or Saturday or Sunday) morning.

good reads | 39

Disney Renaissance

I love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. To that end, here are my good reads from the week that was.

Good Reads

Disney princesses re-imagined as Renaissance women.

A devastating look at Palmyra after Isis.

“Embracing a minimalist lifestyle is an act of trust.” I have many mixed emotions about the KonMari method. It frustrates me, because I often see it executed from a place of privilege and waste: many of its most vocal proponents use it as justification to discard their possessions and buy newer, more “joy sparking” replacements. In spite of this phenomenon, I don’t believe it was Kondo’s intent to spur rampant consumerism in sharing her method. As a quasi-minimalist who appreciates my material possessions for a wealth of reasons — beauty, practicality, sentiment, memory, to name a few — I appreciate her perspective of having fewer things with beautiful purpose. The act of keeping and discarding is a complicated one, as this article hits home. 

A US law school has a PR nightmare on its hands… because it forgot two laws of communications: 1) Always check your acronyms; 2) Don’t put out big news on April Fools’ Day.

On the flip side, Sweden is a country of PR pros. Another cheeky, smart, on-brand campaign from the country dropped earlier this week. 

In a world of smoothies and media. I greatly enjoyed — indeed, savoured — this read from an old blog favourite, Food Loves Writing.

(Dumpster) diving into Toronto’s love-hate relationship with the bold and curious city-dwelling raccoon.

How dapper is this little diner who recently scored a reservation at Sukiyabashi Jiro?

The world’s flags, in seven charts. Happy intersection for we design-slash-data nerds.

Other Roundups to Love

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

Food52’s Weekend Reading (updated Sundays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (last updated: 2016/02/25)

[lead image: Belle reimagined as a Renaissance woman]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday (or Saturday) morning.

good reads | 38

misty-copeland-degasI love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. 

Blink and you miss it… February, where did you go? Between a round-the-clock trade mission for work, a hop to Niagara-on-the-Lake for Family Day Weekend and a week-long visit from my sister, it feels like the month has just started as it wraps.

To that end, here are my good reads for the past few weeks that were.

Good Reads

I don’t use Snapchat, so some of this article was lost on me, but it makes me very grateful that my teenage years came before the time of smart phones.

The world’s best wine, now. Seconding the Tasmanian Pinot Noir, Finger Lakes sparkling (neighbouring Ontario sparkling, as well), and the Rheingau for any and all dry Riesling. Also: Franciacorta > Prosecco any day of the week!

I’m a child of the cult of David Foster Wallace, and while I bend most toward his non-fiction writing, Infinite Jest is still mastery, twenty years later. I wasn’t yet a decade old when it was published, but it’s one of those books forever with me. Time for a reread, twenty years on.

Misty Copeland channels Degas. Stunning.

Hanson could have disappeared. Here’s why they didn’t. As a childhood Hanson fan who grew up with the trio into an adult Hanson fan, this cover story from Entrepreneur is a nice glimpse into the many pursuits of these savvy, shrewd and endlessly creative artist-businessmen.

Let’s copyedit Donald Trump.

Other Roundups to Love

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

Food52’s Weekend Reading (updated Sundays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (last updated: 2015/12/02)

[lead image: Ken Browar & Deborah Ory]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday (or Saturday) morning.

good reads | 37

norman hardie vineyardsI love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. Here are my good reads from the week that was.

Good Reads

Semi-old but exciting news: Canada’s Ben Ing has taken over the kitchen at Noma. 

My employees are amazing people, and I’m always thinking about how I can be a better boss, in turn. 

As a consummate hostess and wife of a Cowboys’ fan, I enjoyed this behind-the-scenes article about securing a coveted invitation to Jerry Jones’ suite at Cowboy Stadium. 

About half-way through my sommelier training, I get this question a lot — “What do you like to drink?” This is a smart list for the novice buyer who wants reliably good wine… and to it, I’d add: Niagara riesling, most anything coming out of the Jura and a recent kick for Sancerre between $20-30. On a related note: we loved the new Esquire miniseries, Uncorked.

Long form: Where to begin? I spent two weeks on holiday at the start of the year, so 2016 began with many good reads. Notable: Jonathan Franzen’s Purity was top notch as expected, keeping me riveted to the last page. I whizzed through the 2015 cult favourite, Girl on the Train, on our train ride home (I’m sure the film rights were whipped up in seconds…). Lauren Groff, who penned my favourite read of 2015, delivered with an earlier work, Arcadia

Other Roundups to Love

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

Food52’s Weekend Reading (updated Sundays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (last updated: 2015/12/02)

[lead image: my own, Norman Hardie’s vineyards, 2015]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday (or Saturday) morning.

good reads | 36

mast brothers chocolateI love a thoughtful link roundup as a way to discover the fantastic writing others are reading and sharing online. Here are my good reads from the week that was.

Good Reads

I’ve never understood the hype over Mast Brothers’ perfectly-mediocre-if-beautifully-packaged chocolate, so this article made a ton of sense.

When Toronto finally decides to get cold, I’m making like a Norwegian and embracing winter. 

To those Americans fleeing President Trump: welcome to Canada!

Last year at this time, an article about relative unknown Elizabeth Holmes made my best of 2014 list. A year later and I’m still utterly compelled by the Theranos CEO and her company’s evolving story.

Do you see a square?

We’ve been exploiting this first year in our beautiful home to host friends, family and colleagues through the holidays. Both this sticky cranberry gingerbread and spiced pear upside-down cake were big hits, served up with a little unsweetened whipped cream.

King Richard III tries his hand as Dear Abby to the Republican presidential hopefuls.

Long form: This week I read Tracey Lawson’s A Year in the Village of Eternityafter picking it up on a whim from my local library branch. It’s a beautiful food memoir that spans the author’s year in the village of Campodimele, Italy — the village of eternity — where people live abundant, long lives. The book is sectioned month by month with the ebb and flow of the harvest — tiny broad beans and baby artichokes in April, peperoncini and tomatoes in September, and so on. Each chapter is devoted to an ingredient’s story with a few recipes to match. It was a speedy, happy read that left me with a dozen new recipes and deepened commitment to eating the seasons.

Other Roundups to Love

Fathom’s Links We Love (updated Saturdays)

Food52’s Weekend Reading (updated Sundays)

101 Cookbooks’ Favorites List (last updated: 2015/12/02)

[lead image: Mast Brothers’ gorgeous product packaging]

Good Reads on Some Infinite Thing is updated every Friday (or Saturday) morning.